Mitac expected to see growing cloud computing sales in 2015

Mitac Computing Technology, a cloud computing affiliate of the Mitac Group, is expected to achieve a double-digit percentage growth on year in 2015. In addition to increased cooperation with system integrator clients, the company also sees its server and storage OEM business growing, according to sources from the upstream supply chain.

In addition to North America, the company also started getting new clients from China and Europe and is expected to land orders from them in the second quarter, the sources noted.

The Mitac Group established Mitac Computing Technology in September 2014 and the affiliate enjoyed strong revenue and profit performance in the year thanks to aggressive orders for cloud computing datacenters despite a decrease in OEM shipments.

Currently, the OEM business accounts for 70% of Mitac Computing Technology’s revenues and is expected to enjoy growth in 2015. The other 30% is contributed by the datacenter business, which is mainly targeting North America and will start stepping into Europe and China in 2015.

With datacenter demand from Europe starting to rise, Quanta and Wiwynn, a server subsidiary of Wistron have both established service centers in the region, looking to land orders.

As for China, Quanta, Wiwynn and Inventec are all aggressively pushing their solutions to major Internet service players such as Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent as well as major telecom carriers.

For the future, the sources believe North America will stay the main battlefield for the server industry. Europe is growing, but the pace is still slow. In North America, players are expected to focus on landing orders from the four major Internet players, Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Amazon.

The sources noted that Mitac Computing Technology has a business model similar to Inventec and is cooperating with regional system integrators to avoid direct competition against its brand clients, but such a move also limits its revenues and profitability.

In addition to the contribution from the cloud computing industry, the Mitac Group is also expected to see revenue contribution from its affiliate’s GPS software, which has been adopted in Jaguar and Land Rover’s cars and is expected to attract more car makers to place orders, and its healthcare wearable devices.

The Mitac Group is expected to see growing sales in 2015
Photo: Michael Lee, Digitimes file photo

Article source: http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20150305PD203.html

Analysing the rise of the distributed cloud model

(c)iStock.com/Erikona

The current model for public cloud computing is an optimisation of the traditional construct of internet-facing data centres: maximise the scale of the facility to serve as broad a market as possible, using the Internet as the means of distribution.

This model is wedded to a separation of the compute from the ‘dumb network’, or to use the original terminology of some 40 years ago, we are still in a world where we separate processing (computing) from inter-process communication (network).

The convenience of this separated relationship has bought us the Internet economy: an autonomous network that can deliver anything anywhere. The rise of cloud computing ‘as a service’ exploits this Internet delivery model, removing the need to buy and build your own data centres.

If buying digital infrastructure as a service is the future for computing, then the next question is whether the current architecture of cloud computing is the final resting place or will evolution take us elsewhere?

The clue to future direction is the current level of investment and activity around how to improve and secure the communication between clouds and between legacy assets and the cloud. Software defined networking, and the numerous cloud connect/exchange products, all seek to create an improvement in the level of communication between clouds. Simplifying the complex world of networks, or trying to bypass them by ‘overlaying’ relationships across the still dumb network. Conversely, those in search of surety look to the narrow and legacy-oriented approach of the ‘meeting room’ model of neutral colocation providers with ‘direct cloud connect products’.

The challenge is that none of these approaches move us on fundamentally. And the elephant in the room is that many are not yet ready to jettison the concept of massive scale data centres with its separated access.

Instead of seeing separate processing pools, connected by ubiquitous-but-murky access or limited-but-assured access, I would invite you to think about a DISTRIBUTED CLOUD where you can distribute and run workloads anywhere. Processing and storage are wherever and whenever you need them to be, for reasons of latency, language, resilience or data sovereignty. The network is appropriately mobile, secure, assured or ubiquitous, according to location.

The key to creating such a distributed cloud is to build the compute into the network. And Interoute has already done this. We have created a distributed, global cloud which offers very low latency, private and public networking with a global pool of computing and storage that you can place anywhere. By deploying network technologies like MPLS we are able to provide logical separation and security for customers, allowing them to build a ‘single tenant’ infrastructure on our global network, as if it was their own.

The distributed cloud model supports the rise in the use of container technologies like Docker, where the developer abstracts from the data centre infrastructure to a distributed computational environment populated by containers. It is unnecessary for the developer to have to ‘go under the hood’ and create static routing relationships between virtual machines. The goal is to provide simple addressing to each application. Add to this the possibility to create resilient, scalable clusters which straddle multiple nodes, without the constraint of traditional routing.

This forward-thinking approach also answers the needs of those running legacy applications, where you want to consolidate or migrate workloads into the cloud without having to jump to a whole new ‘Internet only’ model, which delays implementation, and for the enterprise that mostly means delays in competitiveness and knowledge.

Here in Europe we are sensitive about the idea of ‘one cloud location to rule them all’, not only because of the data sovereignty issue but because of latency and the languages of Europe. If you are building a website in Spain then 90% of your market is going to be Spain and having your ‘processing’ in Ireland or the UK is an unnecessary complication and expense for data traffic that predominantly should stay local. That distance to the processing location hinders performance and throughput so basically you get a slower cloud for your money, or you must upgrade to a more expensive one.

The evolution of a distributed cloud which I envision builds on the technological core of ‘Cloud 1.0′ – fully elastic resources and scale –but moves forward by combining in an intelligent way the twin elements of the digital economy, the network and the computer. Once this model takes hold, the ability to evolve applications toward higher levels of availability and resilience accelerates and all those efforts and products that are trying to simplify the managing of networks simply disappear, as the ‘network’ just works as part of the platform.

I feel we are harking back to the 1980s when John Gage touted the idea of the network as a computer. 30 years on we are finally there.

Related Stories
  • » Gartner analyst muses on why so many are upset with their private cloud
  • » Rackspace posts solid financial results, continues to bang drum for managed cloud services
  • » Cloud making inroads into the capital markets sector, report finds
  • » The hype around cloud computing has been justified, say enterprises
  • » Microsoft gives $500k of Azure credits, Office 365 subscriptions to Y Combinator startups

Leave a comment

log in

Alternatively

This will only be used to quickly provide signup information and will not
allow us to post to your account or appear on your timeline.

Article source: http://www.cloudcomputing-news.net/news/2015/mar/05/analysing-rise-distributed-cloud-model/

Intel Corporation Teams Up With Huawei To Expand In Cloud Computing

Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) and Huawei Technology Co Ltd (SHE:002502) Technology have come together to cooperate strategically on cloud computing, as per an announcement made Wednesday. By partnering with a Chinese firm, Intel plans to retain access to one of the biggest markets in the world.

intel logointel logo

Intel and Huawei together again

Intel and Huawei will work together on new server, data center, software and cyber-security to offer telecom carriers cloud computing services across the world, according to Huawei, which is taking its network overseas. In 2012, Intel and Huawei worked together to form a server and cloud product team, and last year, the duo cooperated on data storage. Apart from Intel, Huawei entered into a deal with Baidu Inc (ADR) (NASDAQ:BIDU).com in mobile internet and indoor location services.

Entering into a partnership with Chinese companies and adopting Chinese partners’ branding help foreign firms to make their products appeal even more to local buyers and authorities in the world’s second largest economy. Apart from Intel, other U.S. firms adopting Chinese partnerships are International Business Machines Corp. (NYSE:IBM), Dell Inc. (NASDAQ:DELL), Cisco Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CSCO), Hewlett-Packard and Juniper Networks. Other companies that have invested in China are Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT), Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) and Alibaba.

Separately, Intel recently joined hands with Ericsson to offer network operator customers data-centers, thus making them more competitive against big cloud-based firms such Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB), Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL), Amazon, etc.

Chinese cloud computing market offers huge potential

In China, the public cloud computing market totaled $717 million in 2014, an increase of 46.7% annually. The annual growth rate is expected to be an average of 33% until 2018, according to U.S.-based International Data Corp. Also Chinese Premier Li Leqiang stated in a recent report that the cloud computing industry is a focus area for China, and the government will support its development. Cloud computing is expected to create 40,000 jobs in China by this year.

For quite some time, the Chinese government has promoted the use of more of Chinese-made and less foreign-made technology to develop domestic firms. Also the move was a response to revelations by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden about U.S. cyber-surveillance. Such policies in China have been a constant factor of tussle in foreign relations, especially with the U.S.

Like this article? Sign up for our free newsletter to get articles delivered to your inbox

Download PDFDownload PDF
Share on StockTwitsShare on StockTwits

Article source: http://www.valuewalk.com/2015/03/intel-huawei-expand-cloud-computing/

Why the Enterprise Cloud Needs Shadow IT

I stumbled across a ZDNet article by Larry Dignan linking to Rightscale’s 2015 State of the Cloud Report referencing how Azure’s use is growing and it’s now become an emerging No. 2 competitor to AWS, a la the famous Avis commercials of long ago, where Avis said “we’re number two but we try harder.” This aligns with the general perception that Microsoft seems to have gotten its feet under it and is charging hard into the public cloud.

After downloading the report, subtitled “Central IT is Taking the Lead to Broker Cloud Services to the Enterprise,” I believe the more interesting and important material is, so to speak, buried in the back pages — where the respondent’s adoption patterns and technology choices are surveyed.

Is IT Really in Charge of the Company Cloud?

And here, despite the subtitle, which implies that central IT is now taking the primary responsibility for cloud computing within enterprises, a different picture emerges — one in which central IT and business units hold very different perceptions of who is responsible for cloud computing decisions.

For example, in the chart (Figure 1) describing “Enterprise Views of Role of IT in Cloud,” there is an identical perspective from both organizations that IT should take the role to “Broker cloud services,” although it’s only 40 percent in both parties.

 

figure 1

Figure 1 (click to enlarge)

In other areas, however, the comity and alignment vanishes. Taking the question of who gets to select public clouds, 59 percent of central IT believes it’s their responsibility, while only 35 percent of business units agree. Perhaps more surprisingly, on the question of private clouds, 57 percent of central IT believe it’s their responsibility, but only 35 percent of business unit respondents agree.

These are vast disparities in how these two groups view the role of central IT, with Central IT viewing itself significantly more important in terms of making choices and executing decisions. One could go so far as to say this portion of the survey indicates very large differences between these two organizations as to the future of IT decision-making within the overall company.

The question is why do these two groups view the ground rules of cloud computing so differently?

One clue goes to the very heart of the matter, in understanding what cloud computing is, and where central IT stands in terms of implementation.

In one question, Rightscale queried respondents about how large the cloud computing environments they operate are. In terms of private cloud, respondents said (Figure 2) that 22 percent of them are running cloud environments with over 1000 virtual machines. Frankly, I find that astonishing.


figure 2

Figure 2 (click to enlarge)

A clue to understanding this comes later in the report, when Rightscale asked respondents what technology they were using to implement their private cloud. Even though Rightscale recognizes that “although virtualized environments from VMware or Microsoft don’t meet all of the requirements of cloud computing, many survey respondents currently view these environments as a private cloud, and so we gave respondents an option to identify them as private cloud technologies.”

As one can see in the chart describing the private cloud technology options IT organizations are using (Figure 3), a full 43 percent of the 74 percent of IT organizations claiming to operate private clouds are using vSphere or System Center. In other words, they are using virtualization products and calling them clouds. My comment to a colleague was this is like me calling my minivan a Ferrari because both have an engine inside of them. It’s a near certainty that nearly all of those 1000+ virtual machine clouds discussed above are really standard virtualization farms, not real cloud environments.

 

figure 3

Figure 3 (click to enlarge)

Article source: http://www.cio.com/article/2892813/cloud-computing/why-the-enterprise-cloud-needs-shadow-it-to-succeed.html

The Business Case for Cloud Computing in Government

Federal agencies are turning to cloud solutions to lower costs, foster innovation and meet the complex demands of the public sector. Cloud is not just about technology, it’s about creating and implementing a new business strategy. This can mean shifting management of assets, changing the cost structure, migrating applications and a host of other business functions, that transform how agencies conduct the business of government. From private to hybrid clouds to FedRamp, FISMA and other security and compliance concerns, exploring the cloud and all its promise and possibilities can be daunting

Having a technology partner that not only understands these challenges, but has worked side by side with government to deliver cloud solutions is critical. For over three decades ViON has offered secure compute, network and storage capabilities, delivered on premise or through the cloud. Our solutions are proven and supported by cleared resources who are highly trained and armed with the industry’s latest certifications and specializations.

We have a legacy of helping our customers meet mission objectives, deliver citizen services and support the warfighter. Let ViON give you Cloud confidence and help your agency design, implement and support a flexible solution that meets the needs and priorities of your agency. Learn more at www.vion.com/cloud

‘5’,
‘type’ => ‘story’,
‘title’ => ”,
‘register’ => false,
‘disp_title’ => false,
‘dynamic’ => false,
‘imglock’ => false,
‘sid’ => ”,
‘nid’ => NULL,
‘image’ => ”,
‘height’ => ”,
‘width’ => ”,
‘caption’ => ”,
‘link’ => ”,
‘mtime’ => ”,
‘text’ => ‘Federal agencies are turning to cloud solutions to lower costs, foster innovation and meet the complex demands of the public sector. Cloud is not just about technology, it’s about creating and implementing a new business strategy. This can mean shifting management of assets, changing the cost structure, migrating applications and a host of other business functions, that transform how agencies conduct the business of government. From private to hybrid clouds to FedRamp, FISMA and other security and compliance concerns, exploring the cloud and all its promise and possibilities can be daunting

Having a technology partner that not only understands these challenges, but has worked side by side with government to deliver cloud solutions is critical. For over three decades ViON has offered secure compute, network and storage capabilities, delivered on premise or through the cloud. Our solutions are proven and supported by cleared resources who are highly trained and armed with the industry’s latest certifications and specializations.

We have a legacy of helping our customers meet mission objectives, deliver citizen services and support the warfighter. Let ViON give you Cloud confidence and help your agency design, implement and support a flexible solution that meets the needs and priorities of your agency. Learn more at www.vion.com/cloud

‘,
‘keyphrase’ => ”,
‘highlight’ =>
array (
‘url’ => ”,
‘title’ => ”,
),
‘must_register’ => false,
) –>

Article source: http://www.federalnewsradio.com/1360/3811099/The-Business-Case-for-Cloud-Computing-in-Government

Cloud Computing Reducing Costs, Improving Productivity

Nearly two-thirds of respondents report faster access to technology with the cloud.

Organizations with more than 500 employees are seeing tangible benefits from cloud computing, with 85 percent saying the cloud has lived up to industry hype and 23 percent declaring that cloud has exceeded their expectations, according to a global study of 1,000 senior IT decision-makers by Tata Communications.
Tata reported that 83 percent of enterprises are seeing benefits they did not expect. The most popular of these are increased productivity (69 percent), better access to data (65 percent), and reductions in costs (63 percent).
The findings also indicate that by 2024, off-premises storage will have overtaken on-premises alternatives. Enterprises are forecast to have 58 percent of their compute and data storage in the cloud in 10 years, compared with 28 percent currently.
“Some of the major challenges a business faces are getting their network to support a cloud platform. Whether that is a private cloud or public, either requires the network to be the “glue” that holds the cloud together,” John Hayduk, chief technology officer of Tata Communications, told eWEEK. “So getting the network to have the necessary performance and uptime is critical to making the cloud platform work.”


Hayduk noted another challenge is the location of data. Given that businesses can pick cloud platforms or application service providers from anywhere, knowing where a company’s data is stored, protected, and who has access to it requires special planning and attention.

When asked how much of their data would be stored in a private cloud by 2024, respondents predicted an average of 52 percent, suggesting the dominance of private cloud storage.
However, 94 percent of respondents say they would be more likely to adopt a hybrid cloud computing model if connections with the public cloud were more predictable.
Nearly two thirds (65 percent) of respondents said using the cloud had led to increased speed of access to technology.

In terms of streamlining business processes, 67 percent have experienced reduced delivery times to clients and partners, and 54 percent have seen the delivery time of new services to new markets or geographies reduced.
“Cloud technologies are really helping to drive more information technology standardization. So tasks like creating a server can be done virtually, and not require any real human intervention to connect or install a server,” Hayduk said. “In the cloud application space, you simply have to create a commercial relationship to get access to the service and start using. Gone are the days of getting software, installing it, testing it, and then rolling it out to your user base.”
He also noted that greater adoption of cloud technologies will create a larger market for application service providers.
“Especially applications that will be created to fill niche problem areas since the cost and deployment of these cloud solutions can be done much quicker and with a much lower upfront investment,” he said

Article source: http://www.eweek.com/small-business/cloud-computing-reducing-costs-improving-productivity.html

Alibaba to open cloud-computing data center in Silicon Valley

Alibaba continues to make inroads in the U.S.

In a move that directly competes with Amazon.com, the Chinese Internet juggernaut announced Wednesday that Aliyun, its 5-year-old cloud-computing business, will open its first overseas cloud-computing data center in Silicon Valley.

Alibaba did not specify which city would house the center, when the facility would open or how much the company would spend to build it.

“For security reasons, we aren’t disclosing the exact location,” an Alibaba spokesman said.

Alibaba invests $10 million in Santa Monica game console maker Ouya

The data center will initially serve Chinese enterprises in the United States, the company said, but the plan is to gradually expand its products and services to international clients in the second half of this year. It is to provide a variety of cloud-computing services that are intended to attract Chinese businesses as they develop various kinds of applications.

Although the center is also envisioned as catering to U.S. businesses, its China focus indicates that the company sees Chinese companies as becoming a bigger presence in Silicon Valley.

Aliyun already has data centers in the Chinese cities of Hangzhou, Qingdao, Beijing, Shenzhen and Hong Kong.

“Aliyun hopes to meet the needs of Chinese enterprises in the United States, and the ultimate objective of Aliyun is to bring cost-efficient and cutting-edge cloud computing services to benefit more clients outside China to boost their business development,” Ethan Sicheng Yu, Aliyun’s vice president, said in a statement.

Shares of Hangzhou-based Alibaba were up nearly 2% in morning trading on Wall Street, but otherwise have been falling since November, losing about $40 off their high of approximately $120.

Chinese entrepreneurs aim to become technology power players

Chinese entrepreneurs aim to become technology power players Andrea Chang Alibaba was just the beginning: Get ready to hear a lot more about Chinese tech companies. Alibaba was just the beginning: Get ready to hear a lot more about Chinese tech companies. ( Andrea Chang ) –>

Twitter: @byandreachang

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-alibaba-data-center-silicon-valley-20150304-story.html

Amazon’s cloud computing unit is worth up to $50B, analyst says

aws2Starting this year Amazon shareholders will know exactly how much revenue the company generates from its cloud computing business when it starts to break out the division’s results for the first time.

But that isn’t stopping at least one analyst from throwing out an early guess. In a note to investors today, analysts at Robert W. Baird said it was valuing Amazon Web Services at $40 to $50 billion, or $95 per share, on a standalone basis, TheStreet reports.

At the end of last quarter, Amazon said it will start breaking out the unit’s financials in Q1 of this year. Before, it was lumping AWS results under an “other” category for North American sales. That total category generated $1.67 billion in revenue during the fourth quarter, but it also included advertising services and co-branded credit card agreements.

The investment banking company also said it believed AWS could become an increasingly important part of the retailer’s business, generating a $20 billion run-rate by 2020.

During the company’s fourth-quarter conference call, Amazon CFO Tom Szkutak did not offer an explanation as to why Amazon will start breaking out the numbers this year, adding “we just think it’s an appropriate way to look at our business for 2015. And so our plan is to separating it out as of Q1 of this year.”

Previously, Amazon has said that it has more than one million active AWS customers, and that usage grew 90 percent in the fourth quarter compared to the year earlier.

Other companies, like Microsoft and Google, will find the numbers particularly interesting, and just last night Alibaba said it was opening a data center in Silicon Valley — its first outside of China — to step up its competition with Amazon.

Based on the performance of AWS, Robert W. Baird also assigned Amazon a higher price target of $425, up from $380. The new price target did very little to influence Amazon’s shares, which were essentially flat today at $384.78.

 

Article source: http://www.geekwire.com/2015/amazons-cloud-computing-unit-is-worth-up-to-50b-analyst-says/

CJ’s Way: How Far Along In The Cloud Are You?

‘)})()
//–



Going all in with cloud isn’t always the best route for every channel partner. Some business models leave room for opportunity in the cloud while others don’t. Transitioning to cloud — if you choose to make the shift — is a journey, not a race

Betting everything on cloud may not be what’s best for every channel partner. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

There’s a way of thinking about cloud computing that the channel needs to throw out the window faster than IBM can lay off employees — and that’s the “all or nothing” approach.

Not everything needs to live in the cloud, even though almost every partner conference points you in this direction. There are times when businesses will want to keep sensitive data on the ground, and their needs — not a vendor’s solutions roadmap — are what keep you in business, don’t you agree?

Top 10 Cloud Services Providers (CSPs) In The Southeast

IBM Layoffs 2015: Here’s What You Need To Know

Top 10 Cloud Services Providers (CSPs) In The Northeast

Going all in with cloud isn’t always the best route for every channel partner. Some business models leave room for opportunity in the cloud while others don’t. What’ll happen to your margins if you move certain offerings to the cloud? Sit down and do the math. Find out what works best for you.

Click here for Talkin’ Cloud’s Top 100 CSP list

Something else to consider is where you are on your journey to the cloud. Not everybody is on the same level — and that’s fine. There’s nothing wrong with diversifying your portfolio. Some channel partners will go all cloud and others will dabble with it here and there. Remember: Transitioning to cloud is a journey, not a race.

“CJ’s Way” is a weekly column written by Talkin’ Cloud Executive Editor CJ Arlotta. It focuses on the cloud, the channel and the chatter.

Upcoming Webcasts

March 5: 7 Steps to Finding the Right Cloud Backup Services Partner

March 12: Replacing SharePoint: Redefining Collaboration through Business-Grade File Sync

March 17: Building Business-Class Continuity Solutions to Protect All Your Customers’ Data

March 19: Leveraging Office 365 to Successfully Take Your Clients To The Cloud

March 24: Panel of Your Peers: How Integrated Security Performance Monitoring Will Grow Revenue and Crush Your Competition

March 26: 2015 MSPmentor 501 Reveal

April 16: Mastering The Dynamics of Pricing for Managed Services in 2015









Featured Authors
CJ’s Way: How Far Along In The Cloud Are You?
Google Container Registry Offers Hosting, Sharing of Containers
TC 100 Profile: Virtustream Offers Consumption-Based Cloud Management
NetApp Cozies Up To AWS



Guest Bloggers

  • AppRiver Guest Blog

  • Easy Office Phone Guest Blog

  • Nuvotera Guest Blog

  • StorageCraft Guest Blog

  • VMware Guest Blog

  • Zetta.net Guest Blog


PISCES


MSP Mentor

Visit mspmentor.net




 


 





Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×

Article source: http://talkincloud.com/cloud-computing-business-models/03042015/cj-s-way-how-far-along-cloud-are-you

ITRI spins off cloud computing unit

Taipei, March 4 (CNA) Taiwan’s state-funded Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI, 工研院) announced on Wednesday that it was spinning off its Gemini cloud OS research team into a company that will use all-encompassing virtualization and integrated cloud technology.

The new company, Gemini Open Cloud Computing Inc. (雙子星雲端運算公司), will provide a “one-stop shop” for resources virtualization in computing, storage and networking.

That will enable enterprises to put their applications on Gemini Open Cloud’s cloud platform while saving over 50 percent on manpower and operational costs, ITRI said in a statement.

(By Jeffrey Wu)
ENDITEM/ls

Article source: http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aeco/201503040006.aspx